Category Archives: Enid Blyton at work

Posts which focus on what we can learn about Enid Blyton’s creative process from her typescripts and other material in the collection

A numbers game

One of our regular volunteers, Ann, has been numbering some of the Enid Blyton typescripts this week.  Once material has been catalogued, everything in the collection is numbered (in pencil, so the number can be easily removed if necessary!).  Each item is … Continue reading

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The writer and the typewriter

I have been doing a little more work this week on the play Famous Five Adventure.  In the auction lot were two copies of the typescript for the play – a top copy, typed in red and black ink, and a … Continue reading

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The Mystery of Fatty’s Overcoat

Today I have been reading through the typescript of The Mystery of Holly Lane, from the Five Find-Outers series.  I have been writing the catalogue description, and comparing the typescript against the published book.  As with most of Blyton’s typescripts, … Continue reading

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…and rewriting?

My last post stated plainly that Blyton’s drafts don’t evidence significant revisions, but this morning I began to wonder if I might have to revise that statement somewhat.  As I began to look in more detail at the typescripts for … Continue reading

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Writing and rewriting

Although Blyton’s first drafts appear to be the only drafts, she did make some changes before sending them off to her editor.  She read through each typescript once it was complete, and made minor changes and corrections by hand.  But these … Continue reading

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A window on the writer

As I have said in a previous post, cataloguing a writer’s papers feels much like opening a window onto their world, looking over their shoulder as they work.  Seeing the original drafts can tell you so much about how a writer … Continue reading

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